Technology

Gaming apps block access in Karnataka as ban takes effect



Sequoia Capital-funded Mobile Premier League (MPL) was among the first few startups that began blocking access to users in the Indian state of on Wednesday following a ban on online


The law, which came into effect late on Tuesday, bans online games involving betting and wagering, and “any act or risking money, or otherwise on the unknown result of an event including on a game of skill”.





The latest ban has intensified concerns that growing state regulations could hit the nascent but booming sector in India, where foreign investors have pumped in millions of dollars in recent months.


On Wednesday morning, MPL’s gaming app showed messages to users in that said: “Sorry! The law in your state does not permit you to play Fantasy sports”, “Fantasy games are locked” and “cash games are locked”.


The gaming app offers fantasy cricket and football games and allows real-money wagering on them.


Dream11, one of India’s most popular gaming apps backed by Tiger Global, was still operational, but Paytm First Games was not.


Dream11 declined to comment, while MPL and Paytm did not immediately respond.


Karnataka, home to some of the world’s biggest tech companies and India’s tech capital Bengaluru, is the latest Indian state that has banned such online games after Telangana and Andhra Pradesh. Tamil Nadu had also imposed such bans, but its bill was struck down by its high court.


An industry source had told Reuters earlier that these states were important for the gaming business and account for roughly 20% of the total business for companies.


Roland Landers, the chief executive of the All India Gaming Federation, said “the industry will challenge this in court and seek legal recourse”.


Two other industry sources told Reuters on Wednesday that gamers and some companies were planning to file court challenges against the new law.


The law imposes hefty fines and prison terms on violaters and has been implemented amid growing concerns that online gaming platforms, like gambling, are addictive and can cause financial harm.


 


(Reporting by Chandini Monappa and Vishwadha Chander in Bengaluru and Aditya Kalra in New Delhi; Editing by Subhranshu Sahu)

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Dear Reader,

Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.

We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor



You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *